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Colleen S. Conley

Associate Professor

Disciplines

  • Psychology

Research Interests

  • My research examines trajectories toward psychological well- and ill-being in adolescence and emerging adulthood. These pathways are illuminated in the context of developmental transition periods, such as puberty and school transitions (into middle school, high school, and college). I am also interested in gender issues, such as exploring the characteristics, contexts, and mechanisms that place adolescent girls and young women at elevated risk for internalizing problems, including depression, body image and eating disturbance, and anxiety. It is my hope that this program of research will inform family-, school-, and community-based interventions aimed at building resiliency in adolescents and emerging adults, in the face of normative and atypical developmental challenges.

Raymond Dye

Associate Professor

Disciplines

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Psychology

Research Interests

  • My research is predominately in the area of human auditory information processing, with an emphasis on binaural hearing and sound localization. At the center of my research program is the question of how the auditory system, when operating in complex, multisource acoustic environments, "parses" the frequency components that are present to form auditory objects
  • how it assigns frequency components to their particular sound sources. My research is particularly aimed at examining the role that spatial hearing plays in segregating concurrent acoustic stimuli, although I have also examined the manner in which binaural cues interact with other variables that promote segregation of sources.  My goal is to develop a set of objective psychophysical procedures that allows one to characterize the tendency of listeners to analytically/synthetically process information across different stimulus dimensions. I have recently become interested in the effects of musical training on the ability to selectively attend to one sound and ignore other concurrent sounds.

James Garbarino

Professor and Maude C. Clarke Chair in Humanistic Psychology

Disciplines

  • Psychology
  • Child Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology

Research Interests

  • My research focuses on issues in the social ecology of child and adolescent development. I have a long standing interest in a wide range of violence-related issues - war, child maltreatment, childhood aggression, and juvenile delinquency. In 1991 I undertook missions for UNICEF to assess the impact of the Gulf War upon children in Kuwait and Iraq, and have served as a consultant for programs serving Vietnamese, Bosnian and Croatian children. I also serve as a scientific expert witness in criminal and civil cases involving issues of trauma, violence, and children. In all these issues I am concerned with how developmental processes are shaped by the human ecology in which they occur, and have a particular interest in matters of spirituality and identity in this process. After completing a project on physical aggression in girls (resulting in a book entitled See Jane Hit: Why Girls Are Growing More Violent and What We Can Do About It), I am currently working on a project dealing with childhood in the face of the terrorist threat.

Robert Morrison

Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director

Disciplines

  • Psychology

Research Interests

  • I am interested in understanding how humans remember and reason.  My collaborators and I use a variety of tools including brain imaging (EEG/ERP), neuropsychology and computational modeling.  We also study these topics in young children and older adults as well as people with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Frontotemporal Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

Stephan Steidl

Assistant Professor

Disciplines

  • Other Social and Behavioral Sciences
  • Psychology

Research Interests

  • My research is generally concerned with understanding brain systems that contribute to appetitively motivated behaviors. It is well established that the dopamine system is important in motivation and reward, but much remains to be learned about how the dopamine system is activated. Most rewards, including several drugs of abuse, activate the dopamine system indirectly.  Environmental stimuli, which through experience predict the availability of rewards, also come to activate the dopamine system, and almost certainly do so indirectly. Thus, understanding the source, type, and nature of afferent inputs to the dopamine system is critical. My interests have been particularly focused on the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg), two closely related brainstem nuclei that excite the dopamine system through both cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs. My laboratory uses a combination of experimental approaches (in-vivo pharmacology, cell-specific lesions techniques, and optogenetics) to understand the role of PPTg and LDTg cholinergic and glutamatergic inputs to the dopamine system in rat and mouse reward-seeking and reward-taking behaviors.