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Article
The faultline activation process and the effects of activated faultlines on coalition formation, conflict, and group outcomes
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (2010)
  • Karen A. Jehn, Melbourne Business School
  • Katerina Bezrukova, Santa Clara University
Abstract
This research examines the effects of group faultline activation on coalition formation, conflict, and group outcomes. We distinguish between dormant faultlines (potential faultlines based on demographic characteristics) and activated group faultlines (members actually perceive subgroups based on the demographic characteristics) and hypothesize that while dormant faultlines do not automatically turn into active group divisions, a group’s entitlement configuration can activate divisions among group members. Study 1 was a construct validity study to verify the psychometric properties of the activated group faultline measure and explain its connection to other process variables. In Studies 2 and 3, we tested our hypotheses and found that groups with activated faultlines were more likely to form coalitions, have high levels of group conflict, and lower levels of satisfaction and group performance than dormant faultline groups. Furthermore, team identification moderated the effects of activated faultlines on group processes such that a strong workgroup identity decreased the likelihood that activated faultlines led to coalition formation and conflict.
Keywords
  • Faultlines; Conflict; Coalition formation; Group entitlement configuration; Team identification
Publication Date
May, 2010
Citation Information
Karen A. Jehn and Katerina Bezrukova. "The faultline activation process and the effects of activated faultlines on coalition formation, conflict, and group outcomes" Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes Vol. 112 Iss. 1 (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/etty_jehn/8/