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Unpublished Paper
Escogedoras and Molineras in Veracruz, Mexico (1928-32): Exploring the Political Role of Popular Women in Post-Revolutionary Society
(2005)
  • Ernesto A. Hernandez-Lopez
Abstract

This article suggests that during Revolutionary state formation (1928-32) in Mexico, Veracruzano women had active roles in state politics. This political participation existed despite women in Mexico being denied legal rights to vote or to hold political office. This essay demonstrates how escogedoras (coffee sorters) and molineras (maize grinders) used their economic influence to negotiate with central and regional governments in Mexico. For escogedoras their participation in an export industry provided 'negotiation power' to participate in politics. For molineras working in an industry which dramatically decreased a woman's work-week from 30 plus hours to 4 hours provided them with similar negotiation power.

Keywords
  • Mexico,
  • gender,
  • women,
  • patriarchy,
  • political participation,
  • hegemony,
  • post-colonial,
  • Mexican Revolution,
  • unions,
  • organized labor
Disciplines
Publication Date
January, 2005
Citation Information
Ernesto A. Hernandez-Lopez, Escogedoras and Molineras in Veracruz, Mexico (1928-32): Exploring the Political Role of Popular Women in Post-Revolutionary Society (2005). Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ernesto_hernandez/18