Skip to main content
Article
Women, Alcoholics Anonymous, and Related Mutual Aid Groups: Review and Recommendations for Research
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly (2012)
  • Sarah E. Ullman, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Cynthia J. Najdowski, University of Illinois at Chicago
  • Ericka B. Adams, University of Illinois at Chicago
Abstract
Recent literature reviews and meta-analyses have supported the effectiveness of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in helping members stop drinking and maintain sobriety. Despite the extensive body of research on AA, less attention has focused on differences in the efficacy of the program for and experiences of women as compared to men. Such a focus is warranted given that there are significant gender differences in the development and progression of alcoholism, impact of drinking, and response to treatment. This review synthesizes results of extant research on women in AA and similar mutual aid groups focused on problem drinking to describe the state of knowledge and make suggestions for future research. Critiques of the ability of AA and 12-Step programs to address women's needs are also reviewed, as are attempts to respond to those critiques. Understudied issues, including the role of victimization histories (which are more prevalent in women who abuse alcohol), are also discussed.
Keywords
  • Women,
  • Alcoholics Anonymous,
  • related mutual aid groups
Publication Date
2012
DOI
10.1080/07347324.2012.718969
Publisher Statement
SJSU users: use the following link to login and access the article via SJSU databases.
Citation Information
Sarah E. Ullman, Cynthia J. Najdowski and Ericka B. Adams. "Women, Alcoholics Anonymous, and Related Mutual Aid Groups: Review and Recommendations for Research" Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly Vol. 30 Iss. 4 (2012) p. 443 - 486 ISSN: 0734-7324
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ericka-adams/4/