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Article
Imaging Biological Samples with the Atomic-Force Microscope
Proceedings of the 51st Annual Meeting of the Microscopy Society of America
  • Eric Henderson, Iowa State University
  • Daniel Jondle, Iowa State University
  • Thomas Marsh, Iowa State University
  • Wen-Ling Shaiu, Iowa State University
  • Luming Niu, Iowa State University
  • James Vesenka, Iowa State University
  • Elis Stanley, National Institutes of Health
  • Philip Haydon, Iowa State University
Document Type
Conference Proceeding
Publication Version
Published Version
Publication Date
1-1-1993
Conference Title
51st Annual Meeting of the Microscopy Society of America
Conference Date
August 1-6, 1993
Geolocation
(39.1031182, -84.51201960000003)
Abstract

The application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to biological investigation is attractive for a number of reasons. Foremost among these is the ability of the AFM to image samples, even living cells, under near native conditions and at resolution equal to, or exceeding, that possible by the best light microscopes. Moreover, the ability of the AFM to manipulate samples it images provides a novel and far reaching application of this technology.

Comments

This is a proceeding from 51st Annual Meeting of the Microscopy Society of America (1993): 512.

Rights
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Eric Henderson, Daniel Jondle, Thomas Marsh, Wen-Ling Shaiu, et al.. "Imaging Biological Samples with the Atomic-Force Microscope" Cincinnati, OhioProceedings of the 51st Annual Meeting of the Microscopy Society of America (1993) p. 512 - 513
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/eric-henderson/45/