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Article
Domestic violence and animal cruelty: Untangling the web of abuse
Journal of Social Work Education (2003)
  • C.A. Faver
  • Elizabeth Strand, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Abstract
During the past 25 years, a growing body of research has documented the links between animal cruelty and interpersonal violence (Lockwood & Ascione, 1998; Ascione & Arkow, 1999). As a result, some communities have formed coalitions of human service and animal welfare organizations to address the interrelated problems of woman battering, child maltreatment, and animal abuse. Yet, although the social work literature has recognized the connections between domestic violence and child abuse (e.g., Pulido, 2001; Featherstone & Trinder, 1997), the role of animals in family violence has been ignored. In light of this omission, this article has four purposes: to explain why the link between animal abuse and domestic violence merits the attention of the social work profession, to review the empirical research on the connections between animal abuse and domestic violence, to suggest relevant knowledge and skills that social workers can use to address this issue, and to offer resources for integrating this content into the social work curriculum.
Publication Date
2003
Citation Information
C.A. Faver and Elizabeth Strand. "Domestic violence and animal cruelty: Untangling the web of abuse" Journal of Social Work Education Vol. 39 Iss. 2 (2003)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/elizabeth_strand/7/