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Article
Mastitis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): the calm before the storm?
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  • Elizabeth Schoenfeld, MD, Baystate Health
Document Type
Article, Peer-reviewed
Publication Date
5-1-2010
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Post-partum mastitis is a common infection in breastfeeding women, with an incidence of 9.5-16% in recent literature. Over the past decade, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a significant pathogen in soft-tissue infections presenting to the emergency department. The incidence of mastitis caused by MRSA is unknown at this time, but likely increasing. OBJECTIVES: We review the data on prevention and treatment of mastitis and address recent literature demonstrating increases in MRSA infections in the post-partum population and how we should change our practices in light of this emerging pathogen. CASE REPORT: We present a case of simple mastitis in a health care worker who failed to improve until treated with antibiotics appropriate for a MRSA infection. CONCLUSION: Recent evidence suggests that just as MRSA has become the prominent pathogen in other soft-tissue infections, mastitis is now increasingly caused by this pathogen. Physicians caring for patients with mastitis need to be aware of this bacteriologic shift to treat appropriately. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Publication ISSN
1553-3506
Citation Information
Schoenfeld E, McKay M. Mastitis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): the calm before the storm? J Emerg Med 2010 May;38(4):e31-4.