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Public Information Officers' Perceived Control in Building Local Public Health Agendas and the Impact of Community Size Public Information Officers' Perceived Control in Building Local Public Health Agendas and the Impact of Community Size
Health Communication (2011)
  • Elizabeth Johnson Avery, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • R. W. Lariscy
Abstract

Using data collected from 280 local public health information officers (PIOs) serving community sizes from rural to urban across the United States, this study examines issues of local autonomy or lack thereof in establishing local health agendas. It specifically addresses how size of community as well as state and federal agencies' agendas affect public health promotion at the local level. Findings reveal low levels of perceived local departmental control in building public health agendas among rural PIOs. Alternatively, urban PIOs report low levels of both perceived state and federal departmental control yet higher levels of local departmental control compared to counterparts in other sized locales. Implications and importance of findings are discussed

Keywords
  • public health information officers,
  • PIOs,
  • local health agenda
Publication Date
June 9, 2011
Citation Information
Elizabeth Johnson Avery and R. W. Lariscy. "Public Information Officers' Perceived Control in Building Local Public Health Agendas and the Impact of Community Size Public Information Officers' Perceived Control in Building Local Public Health Agendas and the Impact of Community Size" Health Communication Vol. 26 Iss. 8 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/elizabeth_avery/3/