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Article
"Incinerating Agent Orange: Operations Pacer Ho, Pacer Ivy, and the Global Legacies of the Chemical War
Journal of Military History (2012)
  • Edwin A Martini, Western Michigan University
Abstract

Most studies of Agent Orange to date focus either on the wartime use of herbicides or the long-term consequences of that use after the war was over. Lost in that narrative gap is the story of what happened to the 2.4 million gallons of Agent Orange still in possession of the U.S. military after its use had been banned in 1971. In addressing this surplus supply during Operations Pacer IVY and Pacer HO, the U.S. Air Force was forced to navigate a host of new challenges that had sprung up in the decade since the start of the war in Vietnam, ranging from the rapid growth of the new environmental movement to new government bureaucracies devoted to environmental protection. In this essay I trace the military’s efforts to negotiate these challenges alongside the ways in which a variety of groups and actors dealt with growing and shifting concerns about Agent Orange and its associated dioxin during these operations. In doing so, this piece seeks to add to the growing body of literature that focuses on the intersections of military and environmental history and help fill a gap in the scholarship on the history and legacies of Agent Orange

Publication Date
July, 2012
Citation Information
Edwin A Martini. ""Incinerating Agent Orange: Operations Pacer Ho, Pacer Ivy, and the Global Legacies of the Chemical War" Journal of Military History Vol. 76 Iss. 3 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/edwin_martini/6/