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Article
The Common Heritage of Mankind and the Sub-Saharan African Native Land Tenure System: 'Clash of Cultures' in the Interpretation of Concepts in International Law?
Journal of African Law (2014)
  • Edwin E Egede, Cardiff University
Abstract

The deep seabed beyond national jurisdiction and the seabed’s resources have been declared the common heritage of mankind. There are however divergent views on exactly what the common heritage of mankind is. Does it connote joint management or common ownership of this spatial area? This article argues that culture is one of the relevant factors to be considered in understanding the interpretation given to the common heritage of mankind by sub-Saharan African states and that the role of culture cannot be ignored in appreciating how states interpret concepts in international law.

Disciplines
Publication Date
Spring April 25, 2014
Citation Information
Edwin E Egede. "The Common Heritage of Mankind and the Sub-Saharan African Native Land Tenure System: 'Clash of Cultures' in the Interpretation of Concepts in International Law?" Journal of African Law Vol. 58 Iss. 1 (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/edwin_egede/17/