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Article
Tobacco control interventions in the emergency department: a joint statement of emergency medicine organizations
Emergency Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Steven L. Bernstein, Yale University
  • Edwin D. Boudreaux, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Rita K. Cydulka, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
  • Karin V. Rhodes, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Nadine A. Lettman, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Sherri-Lynne Almeida, TeamHealth
  • Lynne B. McCullough, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Selma Mizouni, Eastern Virginia Medical School
  • Arthur L. Kellermann, Emory University
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine
Date
9-26-2006
Document Type
Article
Medical Subject Headings
Cause of Death; Cost of Illness; Counseling; Curriculum; Education, Medical, Graduate; Emergency Medicine; Emergency Service, Hospital; Health Services Needs and Demand; Healthy People Programs; Hotlines; Humans; *Physician's Role; Public Health Practice; Quality Indicators, Health Care; Referral and Consultation; Research; Smoking; *Smoking Cessation; United States
Disciplines
Abstract
Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death and illness in the United States. National practice guidelines call for all health care providers to "ask" all patients about tobacco use, and to "advise, assess, assist, arrange" when smokers want to quit smoking (the "5 As"). Emergency departments (EDs) have not been an important locus of tobacco control efforts, although ED patients typically smoke at rates exceeding that of the general population, are interested in quitting, and often have limited access to primary care. To address the role of emergency medicine in tobacco control, the American College of Emergency Physicians convened a task force of representatives of major emergency medicine professional organizations. Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the group met in 2004 and 2005. This article represents a summary of the task force's recommendations for tobacco control practice, training, and research. We call on emergency care providers to routinely assess patients' smoking status, offer brief advice to quit, and refer patients to the national smokers' Quitline (800-QUIT-NOW) or a locally available program. Given the global burden of tobacco-related illness, the task force considers it essential for emergency physicians to conduct research into the efficacy of ED-based interventions and to place tobacco control into the training curriculum for emergency medicine residencies. Tobacco control fits within the traditions of other ED-based public health practices, such as injury control. ED-based tobacco control would allow the specialty to help fulfill the Healthy People 2010 mandate to reduce the prevalence of smoking among US citizens.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: J Emerg Nurs. 2006 Oct;32(5):370-81. Link to article on publisher's site
Comments

At the time of publication, Edwin Boudreaux was not yet affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
16997023
Citation Information
Steven L. Bernstein, Edwin D. Boudreaux, Rita K. Cydulka, Karin V. Rhodes, et al.. "Tobacco control interventions in the emergency department: a joint statement of emergency medicine organizations" Vol. 32 Iss. 5 (2006) ISSN: 0099-1767 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/edwin_boudreaux/34/