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Contribution to Book
U.S. regional economic fragmentation & integration: Selected empirical evidence and implications
The Healdsburg Seminar on Megaregions (2007)
  • Edward J Feser, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Geoffrey Hewings, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Abstract
The emergence of ten U.S. megaregions—increasingly contiguous spaces of high density development and population capturing a high share of U.S. economic activity—raises the question of appropriate scales for local, state and federal policy and how regional planning as a practice can adapt to an extended and, in some cases, almost continuous economic integration over space (RPA, 2006). Notions of cities as functional economic areas, more or less distinct spaces that operate as independent economic units, are less and less tenable as the basis for planning and policy making. At the same time, the megaregion phenomenon does not necessarily imply that the scale of appropriate intervention has simply become larger. Rather, we argue that trends in the U.S. economy mean that regional planning must be increasingly flexible to a broad range of continuously shifting geographies.
Keywords
  • Fragmentation,
  • globalization,
  • value chains,
  • input-output
Publication Date
2007
Editor
P Todorovich
Publisher
Regional Plan Association and Lincoln Institute
Citation Information
Edward J Feser and Geoffrey Hewings. "U.S. regional economic fragmentation & integration: Selected empirical evidence and implications" New York & Washington, DCThe Healdsburg Seminar on Megaregions (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/edwardfeser/27/