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Article
Advice for the Secretary of Agriculture about Management of the Giant Sequoia National Monument
Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences
  • J. N. Clarke, University of Arizona
  • D. M. Graber, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks
  • K. M. Nissen, California Department of Transportation
  • D. D. Piirto, California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo
  • N. L. Stephenson, U.S. Geological Survey
  • D. R. Tormey, ENTRIX Consultants
  • P. E. Waggoner, The Conneticut Agricultural Experiment Station
Publication Date
7-1-2003
Abstract

Landscapes held in public trust are difficult to manage; a living National Monument subject to increased public use presents additional challenges. These landscapes are subject to regional and global effects outside the manager's control, such as global climate change and air pollution. They are also subject to innumerable local variables, most of whose effects are difficult to predict. The giant sequoia groves and their surrounding ecosystem are fiercely loved by many; although the goals may be broadly similar, the objectives and policies of these giant sequoia lovers are often sharply at odds.

Citation Information
J. N. Clarke, D. M. Graber, K. M. Nissen, D. D. Piirto, et al.. "Advice for the Secretary of Agriculture about Management of the Giant Sequoia National Monument" (2003) p. 1 - 70
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dpiirto/22/