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Book
Forensic Science in Court: Challenges in the Twenty First Century (Issues in Crime and Justice)
(2010)
  • Hon. Donald E. Shelton, Eastern Michigan University
Abstract

Forensic Science in Court explores the legal implications of forensic science—an increasingly important and complex part of the justice system. Judge Donald Shelton provides an accessible overview of the legal aissues, from the history of evidence in court, to "gatekeeper" judges determining what evidence can be allowed, to the "CSI effect" in juries. The book describes and evaluates various kinds of evidence, including DNA, fingerprints, handwriting, hair, bite marks, tool marks, firearms and bullets, fire and arson investigation, and bloodstain evidence. Assessing the strengths and limitations of each kind of evidence, the author also discusses how they can contribute to identifying the "who," "how," and "whether" questions that arise in criminal prosecutions. Author Donald Shelton draws on the depth of his experiences as courtroom prosecutor, professor, and judge, to provide a well-rounded look at these increasingly critical issues. Case studies throughout help bring the issues to life and show how forensic science has been used, both successfully and not, in real-world situations.

Publication Date
October 16, 2010
Publisher
Rowman and Littlefield
Citation Information
Hon. Donald E. Shelton. Forensic Science in Court: Challenges in the Twenty First Century (Issues in Crime and Justice). Lanham, Maryland(2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/donald_shelton/23/