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Article
Speaking of Silence: A Reply to "Making Defendants Speak"
Minnesota Law Review Headnotes (2009)
  • Donald P. Judges
  • Stephen J. Cribari
Abstract

In this Response, Professors Judges and Cribari concentrate on explaining why they do not share Professor Sampsell-Jones’s underlying antipathy to the Fifth Amendment right to silence at trial. That antipathy, also frequently expressed by other commentators, is reflected in the article’s proposed rejection of Griffin v. California’s prohibition regarding adverse inferences from the defendant’s assertion of that right. The modern right to silence at trial, while perhaps more robust than framing-era practice, has emerged in a criminal justice system the scope and intrusiveness of which itself greatly exceeds framing-era experience. Griffin’s no-adverse-inference rule, and the right to silence at trial it helps to effectuate, are components of an interrelated cluster of protections, the centerpiece of which is the right to counsel, that reinforce the “test the prosecution” and “anti-inquisitorial” nature of today’s system. While neither theoretically tidy nor practically perfect, those protections at least offer a modicum of dignity which the authors believe many persons would want to have when faced with a powerful adversary in a dehumanizing process. Finally, the authors briefly note why they believe the purported benefits from the reforms proposed in “Making Defendants Speak” are illusory.

Keywords
  • Fifth Amendment,
  • adverse inference,
  • Griffin v. California,
  • privilege against self-incrimination,
  • Sixth Amendment,
  • test the prosecution
Publication Date
2009
Citation Information
Donald P. Judges and Stephen J. Cribari. "Speaking of Silence: A Reply to "Making Defendants Speak"" Minnesota Law Review Headnotes Vol. 94 (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/donald_judges/6/