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Article
The Girl Who Cried Pain: A Bias Against Women in the Treatment of Pain
Faculty Scholarship
  • Diane E. Hoffmann, University of Maryland School of Law
  • Anita J. Tarzian, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2001
Keywords
  • women,
  • discrimination,
  • health law,
  • medical ethics,
  • treatment
Abstract
In general, women report more severe levels of pain, more frequent incidences of pain, and pain of longer duration than men, but are nonetheless treated for pain less aggressively. The authors investigate this paradox from two perspectives: Do men and women in fact experience pain differently - whether biologically, cognitively, and/or emotionally? And regardless of the answer, what accounts for the differences in the pain treatment they receive, and what can we do to correct this situation?
Publication Citation
29 Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 13 (2001).
Citation Information
Diane E. Hoffmann and Anita J. Tarzian. "The Girl Who Cried Pain: A Bias Against Women in the Treatment of Pain" (2001)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/diane_hoffmann/6/