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Article
Chinese Consumer Demand for Animal Products and Implications for U.S. Pork and Poultry Exports
Journal of Agricultural and Applied Econimics
  • Qingbin Wang, University of Vermont
  • Frank Fuller, Iowa State University
  • Dermot J. Hayes, Iowa State University
  • Catherine Halbrendt, University of Vermont
Document Type
Article
Publication Version
Published Version
Publication Date
7-1-1998
Abstract
This paper examines Chinese consumer preference for major animal products and assesses the potential impacts of a reduction in China’s import tariff on its pork and poultry demand and net import. Our analysis suggests that China’s demand for animal products will continue to grow as income increases. Using a trade model, results of our scenario analysis indicate that a reduction in China’s import tariffs will significantly increase its net pork and poultry imports and the U.S. will capture most of the increases. Nevertheless, the impact on the market price in China and the U.S. is likely to be very small.
Comments

This is an article from Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, 30(1), July 1998; 127-140. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner
Southern Agricultural Economics Association
Language
en
File Format
application/pdf
Citation Information
Qingbin Wang, Frank Fuller, Dermot J. Hayes and Catherine Halbrendt. "Chinese Consumer Demand for Animal Products and Implications for U.S. Pork and Poultry Exports" Journal of Agricultural and Applied Econimics Vol. 30 Iss. 1 (1998) p. 127 - 140
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dermot_hayes/166/