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Unpublished Paper
A Literature Review of Applicable Studies Evaluating Effects of Juvenile versus Criminal Prosecution and Incarceration on Juvenile Recidivism
ExpressO (2011)
  • denise savage
Abstract
For hundreds of years this Country has grappled with juvenile crime and sundry approaches to dealing with child criminals. While states convey jurisdiction over juvenile offenders to juvenile, adult and Teen Courts to address juvenile crime, a body of studies has emerged suggesting that trying juveniles in adult courts is more apt to result in an overall increase in recidivism by convicted and incarcerated youths. Nonetheless, because of concerns that juvenile courts provide a mere “slap on the hand” of offenders who, it is perceived, have become more violent in recent years, since the 1980s, states have enacted legislation authorizing or mandating the transfer of more and more juvenile offenders to adult courts for prosecution. Via these “waiver or transfer” laws, it has been posited that the juvenile justice system has morphed from one committed to rehabilitation, to a system committed to punishment; often without regard to rehabilitation. Based on studies discussed below, researchers present overwhelming evidence that the increased transfer of juvenile offenders to criminal courts creates the risk of perpetuating juvenile crime via increased recidivism, particularly among violent juvenile offenders, thus mandating a countrywide evolution in the use of criminal courts to prosecute juveniles.
Disciplines
Publication Date
April 14, 2011
Citation Information
denise savage. "A Literature Review of Applicable Studies Evaluating Effects of Juvenile versus Criminal Prosecution and Incarceration on Juvenile Recidivism" ExpressO (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/denise_savage/1/