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Article
Principal’s self-reflection of differentiated supervision and evaluation: A metacognitive process for principals in light of reform efforts for educational leaders.
College of Education Research Symposium
  • Ian M. Mette, University of Wyoming
  • Bret G. Range, University of Wyoming
  • David J. Hvidston, University of Wyoming
  • Jason Anderson, University of Wyoming
  • Curtney A. McKim, University of Wyoming
Location
ED Annex 318
Start Date
7-3-2014 10:35 AM
End Date
7-3-2014 11:30 AM
Description

This mixed-methods study sought to investigate teachers’ and principals’ perceptions about principals' supervision and evaluation in eight high-performing elementary schools in a large, urban Midwest school district. Findings indicated a significant difference between how teachers with one to three years of teaching experience viewed principals’ differentiated supervision and evaluation when compared to teachers with five to 10 years of experience. Additionally, coding of open-ended questionnaire items completed by teachers resulted in identification of three specific themes, namely relationships/trust building, positive feedback, and routine observations. Moreover, interviews of principals revealed a lack of formal diagnostic skills training to assess teachers’ needs and areas of improvement, as well as evaluation systems that create consistent district protocol but do not translate into helping address individual teacher needs.

Citation Information
Ian M. Mette, Bret G. Range, David J. Hvidston, Jason Anderson, et al.. "Principal’s self-reflection of differentiated supervision and evaluation: A metacognitive process for principals in light of reform efforts for educational leaders." (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_hvidston/4/