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Article
Why Teach Aviation? A Snapshot of the Motivations and Influences Associated with the Careers of Professional Pilot Program Faculty
Collegiate Aviation Review
  • David Carl Ison, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Document Type
Article
Publication/Presentation Date
4-1-2010
Disciplines
Abstract/Description
"The purpose of this study was to identify the motivations and influences that affect the decision of a sample of individuals to enter careers as professional pilot educators at the collegiate level. Six faculty members at four year, University Aviation Association member institutions were selected to participate in the study. Three individuals had a civilian background while the other three followed a military career path. Civilian faculty followed more varied career paths while those of military faculty were more structured. Civilian faculty pursued higher levels of education more for personal interests while military faculty did so due to expectations in the service. Familial and mentor support were both cited as important influences in most cases. The majority of faculty did not directly pursue a career in the professoriate but instead found their way to the occupation in a variety of ways. All but one faculty member were happy with their decision to enter higher education."--from the article.
Publisher
University Aviation Association
Citation Information
David Carl Ison. "Why Teach Aviation? A Snapshot of the Motivations and Influences Associated with the Careers of Professional Pilot Program Faculty" AuburnCollegiate Aviation Review Vol. 28 Iss. 1 (2010) p. 63 - 91
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_c_ison/30/