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Article
Surgical management of preputial injuries in bulls: 51 cases (1986-1994)
The Canadian veterinary journal (1995)
  • A Desrochers
  • G St-Jean
  • David E Anderson
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare success rates for preputial surgery depending on the initial diagnosis, ability to extend the penis, use of sedation and local anesthesia versus general anesthesia for surgery, and surgical technique. Medical records of 51 bulls treated surgically for preputial injury were reviewed. The mean age of the bulls was 2.5 years ranging from 1 to 5 years. Bos taurus breeds (82.3%) were more often affected than Bos indicus breeds (17.7%). The most common breeds represented in this study were Angus (45.1%), Simmental (11.8%), and brangus (9.8%). The seasonal incidence of preputial injuries was higher during the period of May-July (52.9%) and November-February (33.3%). The overall success rate was 70%. Posthioplasty was more successful than circumcision (90% to 43%) (P < 0.05). The success rate for surgeries performed under inhalation anesthesia in the surgery suite was 100% compared with a success rate of 63% for those animals operated on with injectable and local anesthesia in a rotary chute (P < 0.05). The success rate was 88% if the penis could be extended before the surgery and 36% if extension was not achieved (P < 0.05).

Publication Date
September, 1995
Citation Information
A Desrochers, G St-Jean and David E Anderson. "Surgical management of preputial injuries in bulls: 51 cases (1986-1994)" The Canadian veterinary journal Vol. 36 Iss. 9 (1995)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_anderson1/95/