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Article
Use of Doppler ultrasonography and positive-contrast corpus cavernosography to evaluate a persistent penile hematoma in a bull.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (1996)
  • David E Anderson, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • G St-Jean
  • A Desrochers
  • J J Hoskinson
Abstract

A 32-month-old Angus bull was evaluated because of a 2-month history of a slowly progressive swelling located cranial to the base of the scrotum. The mass was 8 x 8 x 6 cm, and was causing phimosis. The mass was determined to be a penile hematoma on the basis of results of ultrasonography and exploratory surgery. Surgical evacuation was not performed initially because the deep fascia of the penis was intact and the hematoma was small; however, the hematoma enlarged slowly during the ensuring 2 months, despite sexual rest and isolation from other livestock. Doppler ultrasonography and positive-contrast corpus cavernosography were performed, and the hematoma was seen as a space-occupying mass within the corpus cavernosum penis; vascular anomalies were not found. The penile hematoma was surgically excised, and the bull was isolated for 60 days. At follow-up, the owner indicated that the bull had returned to pasture-breeding soundness and was still being used 2 years after surgery. The small penile hematoma in this bull was unusual in that it did not respond to medical treatment. Surgical treatment was apparently curative, even though surgery was not performed until 4 months after the hematoma was first detected.

Publication Date
November 1, 1996
Citation Information
David E Anderson, G St-Jean, A Desrochers and J J Hoskinson. "Use of Doppler ultrasonography and positive-contrast corpus cavernosography to evaluate a persistent penile hematoma in a bull." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association Vol. 209 Iss. 9 (1996)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/david_anderson1/88/