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Book
Fault Lines: Tort Law as Cultural Practice
Books
  • David M. Engel, University at Buffalo School of Law
  • Michael McCann, University of Washington
Description

Tort law, a fundamental building block of every legal system, features prominently in mass culture and political debates. As this pioneering anthology reveals, tort law is not simply a collection of legal rules and procedures, but a set of cultural responses to the broader problems of risk, injury, assignment of responsibility, compensation, valuation, and obligation.

Examining tort law as a cultural phenomenon and a form of cultural practice, this work makes explicit comparisons of tort law across space and time, looking at the United States, Europe, and Asia in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. It draws on theories and methods from law, sociology, political science, and anthropology to offer a truly interdisciplinary, pathbreaking view. Ultimately, tort law, the authors show, nests within a larger web of relationships and shared discursive conventions that organize social life.

Publication Date
1-1-2009
Publisher
Stanford University Press
ISBN
9780804756136
Comments
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Citation Information
David M. Engel & Michael McCann, Fault Lines: Tort Law as Cultural Practice (Stanford University Press 2009)