Skip to main content
Unpublished Paper
Combating Liquorlining: State Controlled Alcohol Distribution Increases Public Welfare for Low Income African Americans
(2012)
  • Daivy P Dambreville, Penn State Law
Abstract

One consideration that has not been raised during the persistent debates over alcohol regulation in Pennsylvania is the potential effect that a paradigm switch would have on low income minority communities – in particular, the African American community which makes up the largest percentage of low income inhabitants in Pennsylvania. Low income African American communities are particularly susceptible to legislative changes to liquor laws because they often lack the social and political power to lobby for policies that favor their particular considerations. Moreover, research on issues that disproportionally affect African Americans throughout the United States, such as unusually high levels of middle-age alcoholism, elevated levels of liver cirrhosis, and alcohol-related crime, are in the early stages of being studied. Legislators and other advocates for a privatized liquor system have failed to address the effects that such a system would have on the low income African American community. This article analyzes the predominant regimes of alcohol regulation that exists in the United States and explores the impact of these laws in respect to low income African American communities. Specifically, the analysis will center on whether state controlled monopolies or privatized licensing systems provide greater public welfare for low income African Americans.

Keywords
  • Alcohol Control Board,
  • Liquor Control Board,
  • Pennsylvania,
  • New York,
  • Alcohol,
  • Liquor,
  • African Americans
Publication Date
Spring 2012
Citation Information
Daivy P Dambreville. "Combating Liquorlining: State Controlled Alcohol Distribution Increases Public Welfare for Low Income African Americans" (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/davedambreville/2/