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Article
Narrowed TCR repertoire and viral escape as a consequence of heterologous immunity
The Journal of Clinical Investigation
  • Markus Cornberg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Alex T. Chen, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Lee A. Wilkinson, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Michael A. Brehm, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Sung-Kwon Kim, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Claudia Calcagno, University of Genoa
  • Dario Ghersi, University of Nebraska at Omaha
  • Roberto Puzone
  • Franco Celada, University of Genoa
  • Raymond M. Welsh, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Liisa K. Selin, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
5-1-2006
Abstract
Why some virus-specific CD8 TCR repertoires are diverse and others restricted or “oligoclonal” has been unknown. We show here that oligoclonality and extreme clonal dominance can be a consequence ofTcell crossreactivity. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Pichinde virus (PV) encode NP205–212 epitopes that induce different but highly cross-reactive diverseTCRrepertoires. Homologous viral challenge ofimmune mice only slightly skewed the repertoire and enriched for predictable TCR motifs. However, heterologous viral challenge resulted in a narrow oligoclonal repertoire with dominant clones with unpredictableTCRsequences.This shift in clonal dominance varied with the private, i.e., unique, specificity of the host’s TCR repertoire and was simulated using affinity-based computer models.The skewing differences inTCRrepertoire following homologous versus heterologous challenge were observed within the same private immune system in mice adoptively reconstituted with memory CD8 T cell pools from the same donor. Conditions driving oligoclonality resulted in an LCMVepitope escape variantin vivo resembling the natural Lassa virus sequence.Thus,Tcell oligoclonality, including extremes in clonal dominance, may be a consequence of heterologous immunity and lead to viral escape. This has implications for the design of peptide-based vaccines, which might unintentionally prime for skewed TCR responses to cross-reactive epitopes.
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© 2006 American Society for Clinical Invenstigation

Citation Information
Markus Cornberg, Alex T. Chen, Lee A. Wilkinson, Michael A. Brehm, et al.. "Narrowed TCR repertoire and viral escape as a consequence of heterologous immunity" The Journal of Clinical Investigation Vol. 116 Iss. 5 (2006) p. 1443 - 1456
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dario-ghersi/8/