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Article
Despite Some Gains, Social Security Administration Data Show a Low Level of Workforce Participation Among SSI Recipients
Data Note Series, Institute for Community Inclusion
  • Daria Domin, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Jaimie Ciulla Timmons, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • ThinkWork! at the Institute for Community Inclusion at UMass Boston, ThinkWork! at the Institute for Community Inclusion at UMass Boston
Document Type
Occasional Paper
Publication Date
1-1-2017
Abstract

According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), a total of 4,961,659 blind and disabled recipients1 between the ages of 18 and 64 received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits in 2015. Out of the almost 5 million individuals receiving SSI benefits, only 6.3% worked (n=311,922).

Adults with disabilities between the ages of 40 and 64 were a significant demographic of people who receive SSI, constituting almost two thirds of recipients in 2015 (64%; n=3,167,307). However, only 3.5% (n=111,762) of SSI recipients with disabilities in this age group worked.

In comparison, younger SSI recipients (ages 18–39) constituted 36% (n=1,794,352) of the total SSI recipients. However, their workforce participation was over 3 times higher compared to the 40–64 age group, at 11.2%.

Comments

Data Note No. 58.

Community Engaged/Serving
No, this is not community-engaged.
Citation Information
Daria Domin, Jaimie Ciulla Timmons and ThinkWork! at the Institute for Community Inclusion at UMass Boston. "Despite Some Gains, Social Security Administration Data Show a Low Level of Workforce Participation Among SSI Recipients" (2017)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/daria-domin/12/