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Article
Journal-Keeping and Academic Work: Four Cases of Higher Education Professionals
Reflective Practice: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2006)
  • Dannelle D. Stevens, Portland State University
  • Joanne E. Cooper, University of Hawaii
Abstract

This study examines the journal‐keeping methods of four higher education professionals. Framed in the literature of adult learning theory, the study’s purposes were twofold: to describe the work‐related journal‐keeping practices of these educators and to examine the professional and personal benefits of journal‐keeping. Findings indicate that these professionals use their journals in four ways: to create conversations with themselves about their work and their lives; to organize their work experience and demands; to adapt unique and individual journal‐keeping practices to match their current needs; and to review and reflect on overall, long term career goals and organizational directions. Through the journal, these adults cope with the complex external demands of work life, enabling them to inhabit multiple roles, maintain balance and to see the larger picture in their lives and organizations. These adults believe that taking the time to journal leads to a more organized and meaningful professional life.

Disciplines
Publication Date
August, 2006
Citation Information
Dannelle D. Stevens and Joanne E. Cooper. "Journal-Keeping and Academic Work: Four Cases of Higher Education Professionals" Reflective Practice: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives Vol. 7 Iss. 3 (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dannelle_stevens/11/