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Article
Sovereignty in international law - how the internet (maybe) changed everything, but not for long
Masaryk University Journal of Law and Technology
  • Dan Svantesson, Bond University
Date of this Version
1-1-2014
Document Type
Journal Article
Publication Details

Published version

Svantesson, D. J. B. (2014). Sovereignty in international law - how the internet (maybe) changed everything, but not for long. Masaryk University Journal of Law and Technology, 8(1), 137-297.

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Abstract

Extract: More than once has the concept of sovereignty been declared as passe, ob¬ solete unworkable or even dead, due to societal or technological develop¬ ments. This article focuses on the extent to which the Internet has chal¬ lenged, and continues to challenge, the concept of sovereignty. Focusing on sovereignty in the context of control over Internet conduct, it seeks to demonstrate that, while the Internet has challenged sovereignty to a degree, geo-location - the identification of the geographical location of Internet users - is a 'game-changer' re-emphasising the significance of and implicitly the significance of (territorial) sovereignty.

Citation Information
Dan Svantesson. "Sovereignty in international law - how the internet (maybe) changed everything, but not for long" Masaryk University Journal of Law and Technology Vol. 8 Iss. 1 (2014) p. 137 - 155 ISSN: 1802-5943
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/dan_svantesson/76/