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Teaching tobacco dependence treatment and counseling skills during medical school: rationale and design of the Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco (MSQuit) group randomized controlled trial
Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Rashelle B. Hayes, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Alan C. Geller, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Linda C. Churchill, Unversity of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Denise G. Jolicoeur, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • David M. Murray, National Institutes of Health
  • Abigail Shobend, Ohio State University
  • Sean P. David, Stanford University
  • Michael Adams, Georgetown University Hospital
  • Kola Okuyemi, University of Minnesota
  • Randy Fauver, Stanford University
  • Robin Gross, Georgetown University Hospital
  • Frank Leone, University of Pennsylvania
  • Rui Xiao, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jonathan Waugh, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Sybil L. Crawford, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Judith K. Ockene, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine
Date
3-1-2014
Document Type
Article
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Physician-delivered tobacco treatment using the 5As is clinically recommended, yet its use has been limited. Lack of adequate training and confidence to provide tobacco treatment is cited as leading reasons for limited 5A use. Tobacco dependence treatment training while in medical school is recommended, but is minimally provided. The MSQuit trial (Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco) aims to determine if a multi-modal and theoretically-guided tobacco educational intervention will improve tobacco dependence treatment skills (i.e. 5As) among medical students.

METHODS/DESIGN: 10 U.S. medical schools were pair-matched and randomized in a group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multi-modal educational (MME) intervention compared to traditional education (TE) will improve observed tobacco treatment skills. MME is primarily composed of TE approaches (i.e. didactics) plus a 1st year web-based course and preceptor-facilitated training during a 3rd year clerkship rotation. The primary outcome measure is an objective score on an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) tobacco-counseling smoking case among 3rd year medical students from schools who implemented the MME or TE.

DISCUSSION: MSQuit is the first randomized to evaluate whether a tobacco treatment educational intervention implemented during medical school will improve medical students' tobacco treatment skills. We hypothesize that the MME intervention will better prepare students in tobacco dependence treatment as measured by the OSCE. If a comprehensive tobacco treatment educational learning approach is effective, while also feasible and acceptable to implement, then medical schools may substantially influence skill development and use of the 5As among future physicians.

Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Comments

Citation: Hayes RB, Geller A, Churchill L, Jolicoeur D, Murray DM, Shoben A, David SP, Adams M, Okuyemi K, Fauver R, Gross R, Leone F, Xiao R, Waugh J, Crawford S, Ockene JK. Teaching tobacco dependence treatment and counseling skills during medical school: rationale and design of the Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco (MSQuit) group randomized controlled trial. Contemp Clin Trials. 2014 Mar;37(2):284-93. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2014.01.008. Link to article on publisher's site

Copyright 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

Related Resources
Link to article in PubMed
Keywords
  • 5As,
  • Group randomized controlled trial,
  • Medical school education,
  • Medical students,
  • Tobacco control,
  • Tobacco dependence treatment and counseling
PubMed ID
24486635
Citation Information
Rashelle B. Hayes, Alan C. Geller, Linda C. Churchill, Denise G. Jolicoeur, et al.. "Teaching tobacco dependence treatment and counseling skills during medical school: rationale and design of the Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco (MSQuit) group randomized controlled trial" Vol. 37 Iss. 2 (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/crawfords/123/