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Article
Academic Faculty Working in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives
The Journal of Higher Education (2011)
  • Barry Bozeman, University of Georgia
  • Craig Boardman, Ohio State University - Main Campus
Abstract
The literature on university-industry interactions is bifurcated, with some authors characterizing these interactions as beneficial to economic development and technology transfer and other authors characterizing them as disruptive and harmful to traditional university missions, especially education. While both views may be correct, the extent to which university-industry interactions affect universities’ traditional research and educational missions remains a question that is largely unaddressed empirically. This study is one of the first to use data to address university-industry interactions from both perspectives. The data combine survey and institutional data to compare academic faculty working in both university research centers and university departments to their counterparts who are working in departments only. The data differentiate across a broad sample of university research centers, some which are more involved with industry than others. The results suggest that while academic faculty who are affiliated with centers are somewhat more involved with industry than are non-affiliated faculty, center affiliates are also more involved with teaching undergraduates and support more students at the undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral levels.
Keywords
  • Technology transfer,
  • academic capitalism,
  • university research centers,
  • university-industry interaction
Publication Date
2011
Citation Information
Barry Bozeman and Craig Boardman. "Academic Faculty Working in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives" The Journal of Higher Education Vol. Forthcoming (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/craig_boardman/27/