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Article
Engineering estimates versus impact evaluation of energy efficiency projects: Regression discontinuity evidence from a case study
Energy Policy
  • Corey Lang, University of Rhode Island
  • Matthew Siler
Document Type
Article
Date of Original Version
6-18-2013
DOI
10.1016/j.enpol.2013.06.122
Abstract

Energy efficiency upgrades have been gaining widespread attention across global channels as a cost-effective approach to addressing energy challenges. The cost-effectiveness of these projects is generally predicted using engineering estimates pre-implementation, often with little ex post analysis of project success. In this paper, for a suite of energy efficiency projects, we directly compare ex ante engineering estimates of energy savings to ex post econometric estimates that use 15-minute interval, building-level energy consumption data. In contrast to most prior literature, our econometric results confirm the engineering estimates, even suggesting the engineering estimates were too modest. Further, we find heterogeneous efficiency impacts by time of day, suggesting select efficiency projects can be useful in reducing peak load.

Citation Information

This is a pre-publication author manuscript. The final published version is available at:

Corey Lang, Matthew Siler, "Engineering estimates versus impact evaluation of energy efficiency projects: Regression discontinuity evidence from a case study." Energy Policy, Volume 61, October 2013, Pages 360-370, ISSN 0301-4215.

Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enpol.2013.06.122.