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What Christians Need No Longer Defend: The Political Stakes of Considering Antinomianism as Central to the Practice and History of Theology
Crisis and Critique
  • Colby Dickinson, Loyola University Chicago
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
2-1-2015
Abstract
Through a brief history of antinomian thought within the modern period, and the inspection of two contemporary responses to the ‘antinomian impulse’, I refocus the antinomian debate as being, not necessarily a heretical endeavor, but rather a dialectic between history and memory, structure and experience. Rather than portray antinomianism as a threat to the system which needs to be removed, perhaps we can learn to perceive it as a ‘weak messianic force’ moving through all constituted (religious) identities, not, then, as the end of ‘Christianity’ as an organized religion, but its original proclamation, ever in need of greater reformation.
Pages
115-149
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Author Posting. © Colby Dickinson, 2015. This article is posted here by permission of the author for personal use, not for redistribution. The article was published in Crisis and Critique, Volume 2, Issue 1, 2015.

Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0
Citation Information
Colby Dickinson. "What Christians Need No Longer Defend: The Political Stakes of Considering Antinomianism as Central to the Practice and History of Theology" Crisis and Critique Vol. 2 Iss. 1 (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/colby_dickinson/9/