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Unpublished Paper
Polarized Circuits: Party Affiliation of Appointing Presidents, Ideology and Circuit Court Voting in Race and Gender Civil Rights Cases
ExpressO (2010)
  • Christopher R Smith, American University Washington College of Law
Abstract
ABSTRACT Polarized Circuits: Party Affiliation of Appointing Presidents, Ideology and Circuit Court Voting in Race and Gender Civil Rights Cases This article seeks to examine the impact of Presidential party affiliation on the ideological voting patterns of Circuit Court judicial appointments within the context of race and gender civil rights cases. The article assesses two hypotheses regarding Circuit Court judicial voting patterns in race and gender civil rights cases: 1) That the ideological voting gap between Democratic appointed Circuit Court judges and Republican appointed Circuit Court judges has widened over time within the context of race and gender civil rights cases and 2) That Republican and Democratic appointed Circuit Court judges are more closely aligned in their ideological voting patterns in gender civil rights cases than in race civil rights cases. After examining the validity of the two proposed hypotheses, the article proceeds to offer suggestions regarding future empirical studies, designed to more effectively test the two hypotheses. Finally, the article concludes by making predictions regarding the possible impact and influence of President Obama’s likely Circuit Court appointments over the next four or eight years on the two posited hypotheses.
Disciplines
Publication Date
July 11, 2010
Citation Information
Christopher R Smith. "Polarized Circuits: Party Affiliation of Appointing Presidents, Ideology and Circuit Court Voting in Race and Gender Civil Rights Cases" ExpressO (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/christopher_smith/1/