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Article
Who Talks How to Their Kids About TV: A Clarification of Demographic Correlates of Parental Mediation Patterns
Communication Research Reports
  • Erica Weintraub Austin
  • Christopher Knaus, University of Washington Tacoma
  • Ana Meneguelli
Publication Date
9-1-1997
Document Type
Article
Abstract

A random telephone survey (N = 255) of Washington state parents of children between the ages of 2 and 17 assesses parents' reported patterns of interaction with their children regarding television, along with parental viewing habits and perceptions of television content. Demographic differences in mediation and coviewing patterns, as well as parental attitudes toward television, are explored, and explanations for these differences are considered. It is concluded that education is a weak predictor of mediation levels, single parents do not differ from dual parents in attitudes about television, and that the negative relationship of income to positive mediation and use of television as a babysitter is related more to overall viewing patterns and environmental constraints, rather than to attitudinal differences. It is suggested that demographics hold little value jar explaining why and how parents hold particular attitudes or engage in particular behaviors relevant to television and parenting.

DOI
10.1080/08824099709388685
Version
pre-print, post-print (with 18 month embargo)
Citation Information
Erica Weintraub Austin, Christopher Knaus and Ana Meneguelli. "Who Talks How to Their Kids About TV: A Clarification of Demographic Correlates of Parental Mediation Patterns" Communication Research Reports Vol. 14 Iss. 4 (1997) p. 418 - 430
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/christopher_knaus/24/