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Presentation
Why some physicians accept healthcare IT and others resist it: An activity-theoretic analysis.
Faculty Publications
  • Anol Bhattacherjee
  • Christopher Davis
  • Neset Hikmet
SelectedWorks Author Profiles:

Christopher J. Davis

Document Type
Presentation
Publication Date
2013
Date Issued
2013-01-01
Date Available
2013-11-04
Abstract

This paper examines why physicians react differently to the introduction of healthcare information technology (IT) in the same hospital at the same time. These diverse reactions, manifested as different forms of acceptance and resistance, are interpreted within the social-historical context of physicians’ work at a large urban hospital in the USA, using Activity Theory as the theoretical lens. While prior IT research has examined patterns of “similarities” in user behaviors, we examine user “differences” and reconcile these differences within a meta-theoretic framework. We also extend current IT usage research from voluntary to mandatory setting and demonstrate the viability of activity theory as an interpretive lens for future research.

Comments

This is the author's version of a work that was presented at the 2013 International DSI and Asia Pacific DSI Conference, Bali, Indonesia

Language
en_US
Publisher
International DSI and Asia Pacific DSI Conference
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
Citation Information
Bhattacherjee, A., Davis, C.J., & Hikmet, N. (2013). Why some physicians accept healthcare IT and others resist it: An activity-theoretic analysis. Presentation at the 2013 International DSI and Asia Pacific DSI Conference, Bali, Indonesia