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Article
A Longitudinal Study of Children of Alcoholics: Predicting Young Adult Substance Use Disorders, Anxiety, and Depression
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
  • Laure Chassin, Arizona State University
  • Steven C Pitts
  • Christian DeLucia, Nova Southeastern University, Center for Psych Studies
  • Michael Todd
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
2-1-1999
Keywords
  • Adolescent,
  • Alcoholism,
  • Anxiety Disorders,
  • Case-Control Studies,
  • Child of Impaired Parents
Disciplines
Peer Reviewed
1
Abstract

This study tested the specificity of parent alcoholism effects on young adult alcohol and drug abuse/dependence, anxiety, and depression, and tested whether adolescent symptomatology and substance use mediated parent alcoholism effects. Participants were from a longitudinal study in which a target child was assessed in adolescence and young adulthood with structured interview measures (N = 454 families at Time 1). Results showed unique effects of parent alcoholism on young adult substance abuse/dependence diagnoses over and above the effects of other parental psychopathology. There was some evidence of parent alcoholism effects on young adult depression and of maternal alcoholism effects on young adult anxiety, although these were not found consistently across subsamples. Mediational models suggested that parent alcoholism effects could be partially (but not totally) explained by adolescent externalizing symptoms.

DOI
10.1037/0021-843X.108.1.106
Citation Information
Laure Chassin, Steven C Pitts, Christian DeLucia and Michael Todd. "A Longitudinal Study of Children of Alcoholics: Predicting Young Adult Substance Use Disorders, Anxiety, and Depression" Journal of Abnormal Psychology Vol. 108 Iss. 1 (1999) p. 106 - 119 ISSN: 0021-843X
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/christian-delucia/6/