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Article
The Communication Model and the Nature of Change in Terms of Deforestation in China Since 1949
Applied Environmental Education and Communication
  • Dexin Tian, Savannah College of Art and Design
  • Chin-Chung Chao, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
6-1-2010
Abstract

This article explores the communication model and nature of change in terms of deforestation in China since 1949. Through Lasswell’s communication model and the theory of change and via historical analysis and extended literature review, we have discovered: First, Mao’s government adopted an effective one-way top-down communication model with Chinese characteristics during 1949 and 1978, which facilitated deforestation in China leading to massive economic dislocation and immense waste of resources. Second, the Chinese government’s change to practical ideology brought about new administrative practices of enacting forest protection laws and reorientating the relevant workforces to use available technologies for the production of exported furniture with imported timber. Finally, the paradigmatic shift in the Chinese forest management has partially relocated deforestation from China to other countries, which calls for urgent international attention.

Comments

This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published Tian, D., & Chao, C. C. (2010). The communication model and the nature of change in terms of deforestation in China since 1949. Applied Environmental Education & Communication, 9:2, 122-130. © 2010 Taylor & Francis, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1533015X.2010.482493.

Citation Information
Dexin Tian and Chin-Chung Chao. "The Communication Model and the Nature of Change in Terms of Deforestation in China Since 1949" Applied Environmental Education and Communication Vol. 9 Iss. 2 (2010) p. 122 - 130
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/chinchung_chao/11/