Skip to main content
Article
Evidence for Prehistoric Maize Horticulture at the Pine Hill Site, Deerfield, Massachusetts
Northeast Anthropology (2000)
  • Elizabeth Chilton, University of Massachusetts - Amherst
  • Largy B Tonya, University of Massachusetts - Amherst
  • Kathryn Curran, University of Massachusetts - Amherst
Abstract

The degree of reliance on maize horticulture by New England Algonquians during the Late Woodland Period (ad 1000–1600) is a subject of debate among archaeologists in the region. Archaeological evidence from the Pine Hill site (19FR17), Deerfield, Massachusetts, indicates that while maize was apparently stored by native peoples in subterranean pits, it was not necessarily a staple food; there is, in fact, more evidence to suggest that maize was a dietary supplement in the middle Connecticut Valley (Massachusetts portion) during the Late Woodland period. Evidence from the Pine Hill site and other sites underscores the need for attention to diversity in subsistence-settlement economies of Woodland peoples.

Keywords
  • prehistoric horticulture,
  • Massachusetts,
  • Algonquian
Publication Date
Spring 2000
Citation Information
Elizabeth Chilton, Largy B Tonya and Kathryn Curran. "Evidence for Prehistoric Maize Horticulture at the Pine Hill Site, Deerfield, Massachusetts" Northeast Anthropology Vol. 59 (2000)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/chilton_elizabeth/33/