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Article
Capillaries, Old Age and Alzheimer’s Disease
Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism
  • Charles T. Ambrose, University of Kentucky
Abstract
Many of the minor complaints of old age may have a common etiology and are grouped together here under the term ‘the lesser ailments of aging’ (LAA). This essay proposes that they are due in large part to an age-linked reduced microcirculation. Capillary density (CD) in the tissues is determined by levels of angiogenic growth factors (AGFs). Over 47 studies have reported a reduced CD and/or waning AGFs throughout the bodies of aging animals and people. More convincing than such a generalization are the 80 sets of data comparing these two parameters in adult vs. the aged. These data have led to a hypothesis whose corollary proposes a specific treatment for the LAA. While genetically controlled, the waning levels of AGFs theoretically could be countered by pro-angiogenesis therapy and thus might ease the LAA or delay their onset. Therapies mentioned here include recombinant AGFs and inhibitors of type 5 phosphodiesterases, such a tadalafil/Cialis. Finally, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is generally an illness of the elderly and may have a single or multiple causes. However, its clinical course may be influenced secondarily by conditions affecting the LAA. Therefore, any effective treatment of them may influence favorably the clinical course of AD.
Document Type
Commentary
Publication Date
3-9-2017
Disciplines
Notes/Citation Information

Published in Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism, v. 7, issue 2, p. 1-4.

© 2017 Ambrose CT.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
https://doi.org/10.4172/2161-0460.1000309
Citation Information
Charles T. Ambrose. "Capillaries, Old Age and Alzheimer’s Disease" Journal of Alzheimers Disease & Parkinsonism Vol. 7 Iss. 2 (2017) p. 1 - 4
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/charles_ambrose/67/