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Contribution to Book
The balance of power and U.S. foreign policy interests in the Russian Far East.
NBR Analysis (2000)
  • Rajan Menon
  • Charles E. Ziegler, University of Louisville
Abstract
The Russian Far East is of great significance to the economic well–being and security of Northeast Asia. The region has an area of 6.2 million square kilometers—well over one–fourth of the Russian Federation's total area and three–fourths the size of the contiguous United States. By contrast, its population, at less than eight million, is just over five percent of the Russian Federation's total population. It lies nine time zones to the east of Moscow and is connected to the Russian heartland by communications links that are long, few in number, and vulnerable to boot, yet its wealth in energy and various industrial raw materials is abundant. It is located next to China, a rising power, and the Korean Peninsula, a potential flashpoint, and it overlooks Japan, the world's second largest economy.

The size, remoteness, and strategic salience of the Russian Far East raise the question of Moscow's ability to control and defend this region, the more so given a Russian government so hobbled by economic and military weakness that it can use neither fear nor favors to control its outlying regions. Under these circumstances, the fate of the Russian Far East is of great concern to Moscow. [1] For their part, residents of the Russian Far East tend to believe that Moscow has little to offer them, and that its priorities and concerns are becoming progressively disassociated from theirs.
Publication Date
December, 2000
Publisher
National Bureau of Asian Research
Series
NBR Analysis
ISBN
9781939131171
Citation Information
Rajan Menon and Charles E. Ziegler. "The balance of power and U.S. foreign policy interests in the Russian Far East." SeattleNBR Analysis Vol. 11:5 (2000) p. 175 - 202
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/charles-ziegler/6/