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Article
Survivors of an Acute Coronary Syndrome With Lower Patient Activation Are More Likely to Experience Declines in Health-Related Quality of Life
University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications
  • Nathaniel A. K. Erskine, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Barbara L. Gandek, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Molly E. Waring, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Rebecca L. Kinney, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Darleen M. Lessard, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Randolph S. Devereaux, Mercer University
  • Stavroula A. Chrysanthopoulou, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Catarina I. Kiefe, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Robert J. Goldberg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Clinical and Population Health Research Program; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, MD/PhD Program
Publication Date
6-1-2017
Document Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patient activation comprises the knowledge, skills, and confidence for self-care and may lead to better health outcomes. OBJECTIVES: We examined the relationship between patient activation and changes in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after hospitalization for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). METHODS: We studied patients from 6 medical centers in central Massachusetts and Georgia who had been hospitalized for an ACS between 2011 and 2013. At 1 month after hospital discharge, the patients completed the 6-item Patient Activation Measure and were categorized into 4 levels of activation. Multinomial logistic regression analyses compared activation level with clinically meaningful changes ( > /=3.0 points, generic; > /=10.0 points, disease-specific) in generic physical (SF-36v2 Physical Component Summary [PCS]), generic mental (SF-36v2 Mental Component Summary [MCS]), and disease-specific (Seattle Angina Questionnaire [SAQ]) HRQOL from 1 to 3 and 1 to 6 months after hospitalization, adjusting for potential sociodemographic and clinical confounders. RESULTS: The patients (N = 1042) were, on average, 62 years old, 34% female, and 87% non-Hispanic white. A total of 10% were in the lowest level of activation. The patients with the lowest activation had 1.95 times (95% confidence interval, 1.05-3.62) and 2.18 times (95% confidence interval, 1.17-4.05) the odds of experiencing clinically significant declines in MCS and SAQ HRQOL, respectively, between 1 and 6 months than the most activated patients. The patient activation level was not associated with meaningful changes in PCS scores. CONCLUSIONS: Hospital survivors of an ACS with lower activation may be more likely to experience declines in mental and disease-specific HRQOL than more-activated patients, identifying a group at risk of poor outcomes.
Keywords
  • health status,
  • heart disease,
  • self-care
DOI of Published Version
10.1097/JCN.0000000000000429
Source
J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2017 Jun 1. doi: 10.1097/JCN.0000000000000429. [Epub ahead of print] Link to article on publisher's site
Comments

First author Nathaniel Erskine is a doctoral student in the Clinical and Population Health Research and MD/PhD programs in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) at UMass Medical School.

Related Resources

Link to Article in PubMed

PubMed ID
28574974
Citation Information
Nathaniel A. K. Erskine, Barbara L. Gandek, Molly E. Waring, Rebecca L. Kinney, et al.. "Survivors of an Acute Coronary Syndrome With Lower Patient Activation Are More Likely to Experience Declines in Health-Related Quality of Life" (2017) ISSN: 0889-4655 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/catarina_kiefe/272/