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Relation of longitudinal changes in body mass index with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk scores in middle-aged black and white adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
University of Massachusetts Medical School Faculty Publications
  • Duke Appiah, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Pamela J. Schreiner, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Raegan W. Durant, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Catarina I. Kiefe, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Catherine M. Loria, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
  • Cora E. Lewis, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • O. Dale Williams, Florida International University
  • Sharina D. Person, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Stephen Sidney, Kaiser Permanente
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
Date
8-1-2016
Document Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: We assessed whether longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI) are positively associated with changes in 10-year American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk scores in middle-aged blacks compared to whites. METHODS: Data were from 1691 participants enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study aged 40 years or more in 2000-2001, who had follow-up examinations 5 and 10 years later. RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity increased from 32.3% in 2000-2001 (mean age: 42.8 years) to 41.7% in 2010-2011, higher in blacks than whites. The corresponding change in 10-year ASCVD risk was significantly higher for blacks (men: 4.5%-9.6%, women: 1.7%-5.0%) than whites (men: 2.4%-5.2%, women: 0.7%-1.6%). In 2010-2011, 57.5% of black men had ASCVD risk scores of 7.5% or more compared to white men (14.7%), black women (17.4%), and white women (1.6%). Although BMI trends were positively associated with 10-year change in ASCVD risk scores (0.07% per 1 kg/m(2) increase), it explained very little variance in risk score trends in all race-sex groups. CONCLUSIONS: In middle-aged adults, longitudinal changes in BMI had little independent influence on changes in 10-year ASCVD risk scores as its effect may be largely mediated through ASCVD risk factors already accounted for in the risk score.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Ann Epidemiol. 2016 Aug;26(8):521-6. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.06.008. Epub 2016 Jun 17. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
Keywords
  • Cardiovascular disease,
  • Obesity,
  • Risk prediction
PubMed ID
27402259
Citation Information
Duke Appiah, Pamela J. Schreiner, Raegan W. Durant, Catarina I. Kiefe, et al.. "Relation of longitudinal changes in body mass index with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk scores in middle-aged black and white adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study" Vol. 26 Iss. 8 (2016) ISSN: 1047-2797 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/catarina_kiefe/261/