Skip to main content
Article
Medication assistance programs: do all in need benefit equally
Quantitative Health Sciences Publications and Presentations
  • Maria Pisu, University of Alabama
  • Katie Crenshaw, University of Alabama
  • Ellen M. Funkhouser, University of Alabama
  • Midge N. Ray, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Catarina I. Kiefe, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Kenneth G. Saag, University of Alabama
  • Cynthia L. LaCivita, ASHP Research and Education Foundation
  • Jeroan J. Allison, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
Publication Date
11-1-2010
Document Type
Article
Subjects
African Americans; Aged; Alabama; Cross-Sectional Studies; Drug Industry; Drug Prescriptions; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Humans; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Social Welfare
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine if medication assistance programs (MAPs) provided by pharmaceutical companies were used differently by African Americans and Whites. RESEARCH DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients of primary care practices from 2005 to 2007 within the Alabama Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Patient Safety Study. SETTING: Telephone survey. PARTICIPANTS: Respondents were 568 African American and White patients reporting annual household incomes < $50,000. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Use of MAPs. RESULTS: Of all patients, 12.8% used MAPs, 39.5% were African American, 75.2% were female, 69.1% were aged > 65 years, 79.8% had annual household incomes < $25,000, and 35.5% indicated that their income was inadequate to meet their basic needs. MAPs were used by 11.2% African-Americans and 14.0% Whites. After multivariable adjustment, MAP use was higher among respondents with incomes not adequate to meet basic needs (odds ratio [OR]: 2.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-4.08) but lower among African Americans than Whites (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.25-0.95). Physician characteristics did not independently predict MAP use. CONCLUSIONS: Overall MAP use was low even among the most vulnerable, and especially among African Americans. As currently used, MAPs may contribute to disparities in medication access.
Source
Ethn Dis. 2010 Autumn;20(4):339-45.
PubMed ID
21305819
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
Citation Information
Maria Pisu, Katie Crenshaw, Ellen M. Funkhouser, Midge N. Ray, et al.. "Medication assistance programs: do all in need benefit equally" Vol. 20 Iss. 4 (2010) ISSN: 1049-510X (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/catarina_kiefe/195/