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Article
Validity of self-reports of reasons for hospitalization by young adults and risk factors for discordance with medical records: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study
Quantitative Health Sciences Publications and Presentations
  • Atiq Rahman, University of Alabama
  • Laura Gibney, University of Alabama
  • Sharina D. Person, University of Alabama
  • O. Dale Williams, University of Alabama
  • Catarina I. Kiefe, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Pauline Jolly, University of Alabama
  • Jeffrey Roseman, University of Alabama
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences
Date
8-4-2005
Document Type
Article
Medical Subject Headings
Adult; African Continental Ancestry Group; Chi-Square Distribution; Coronary Disease; European Continental Ancestry Group; Female; Hospitalization; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; *Medical Records; Questionnaires; Reproducibility of Results; Risk Factors; *Self Disclosure; United States
Abstract
This research focused on the validity of young adults' (mean age=33 years; standard deviation, 3.9) self-reports of reasons for hospitalization and factors affecting validity in a longitudinal cohort study of over 5,000 young adults in four US cities (1985-1998). Self-reported reasons were considered discordant if they differed from those in medical records. Of the 321 self-reported hospitalizations, overall concordance was 92.5%; concordance ranged from 80% for infections to 100% for injuries/fractures and procedures/surgeries. There were no significant differences among mail, telephone, or face-to-face methods of collecting self-reports. In generalized estimating equations analyses, Black race (odds ratio=4.23, 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 10.40; p=0.002) and intravenous drug use (odds ratio=6.06, 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 31.22; p=0.03) were positively associated with discordance. Nonetheless, self-reports by Blacks were 90.0% concordant. Self-reports by Whites were 95.7% concordant. These results suggest that young adults' self-reported reasons for hospitalization are overwhelmingly concordant with medical records. This has important implications, since obtaining medical records has become more costly and logistically difficult.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Sep 1;162(5):491-8. Epub 2005 Aug 2. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
Citation Information
Atiq Rahman, Laura Gibney, Sharina D. Person, O. Dale Williams, et al.. "Validity of self-reports of reasons for hospitalization by young adults and risk factors for discordance with medical records: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study" Vol. 162 Iss. 5 (2005) ISSN: 0002-9262 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/catarina_kiefe/19/