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Article
Emotions in Teaching Environmental Education
Cultural Studies of Science Education
  • Cassie F. Quigley, Clemson University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2015
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Disciplines
Abstract
This op-ed article examines the emotional impact of teaching environmental science and considers how certain emotions can broaden viewpoints and other emotions narrow them. Specifically, it investigates how the topic of climate change became an emotional debate in a science classroom because of religious beliefs. Through reflective practice and examination of positionality, the author explored how certain teaching practices of pre-service science teachers created a productive space and other practices closed down the conversations. This article is framed with theories that explore both divergent and shared viewpoints.
Comments

This manuscript has been published in the journal Cultural Studies of Science Education. Please find the published version here (note that a subscription is necessary to access this version):

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11422-014-9657-1/fulltext.html

Springer holds the copyright in this article

Citation Information
Please use publisher's recommended citation. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11422-014-9657-1/fulltext.html