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Article
Rhetorical Counterinsurgency: The FBI and the American Indian Movement
Advances in the History of Rhetoric
  • Casey R. Kelly, Butler University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2007
Disciplines
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15362426.2007.10557283
Abstract
This essay unfolds in three sections. First, I develop a theory ofrhetorical counterinsurgency and explain its refinement within theFBI as a method of threat control and management. Second, I situate rhetorical counterinsurgency within a series of migrating culturalcontexts, including the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and culturalstereotypes of American Indians. These contexts constrained theavailable interpretations of Indian, as well as non-Indian radicalism andjustified the application of techniques of counterinsurgency. Finally,I offer a rhetorical analysis of both the FBI’s use of communicativetactics as a method of counterinsurgency as well as the content of theirrhetorical constructions of AIM. I investigate two disarming topoi ofsavagery: AIM as communist surrogate and American Viet Cong.
Rights

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in ADVANCES IN THE HISTORY OF RHETORIC on November 26, 2012, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/15362426.2007.10557283.

Citation Information
Casey R. Kelly. Rhetorical Counterinsurgency: The FBI and the American Indian Movement. Advances in the History of Rhetoric 10 (2007): 223-258. Available from digitalcommons.butler.edu/ccom_papers/29