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Article
Abortion and Mental Health: Evaluating the Evidence
American Psychologist
  • Brenda Major
  • Mark Applebaum
  • Linda Beckman
  • Mary Ann Dutton
  • Nancy Felipe Russo
  • Carolyn West, University of Washington Tacoma
Publication Date
12-31-2009
Document Type
Article
Abstract
The authors evaluated empirical research addressing the relationship between induced abortion and women's mental health. Two issues were addressed: (a) the relative risks associated with abortion compared with the risks associated with its alternatives and (b) sources of variability in women's responses following abortion. This article reflects and updates the report of the American Psychological Association Task Force on Mental Health and Abortion (2008). Major methodological problems pervaded most of the research reviewed. The most rigorous studies indicated that within the United States, the relative risk of mental health problems among adult women who have a single, legal, first-trimester abortion of an unwanted pregnancy is no greater than the risk among women who deliver an unwanted pregnancy. Evidence did not support the claim that observed associations between abortion and mental health problems are caused by abortion per se as opposed to other preexisting and co-occurring risk factors. Most adult women who terminate a pregnancy do not experience mental health problems. Some women do, however. It is important that women's varied experiences of abortion be recognized, validated, and understood.
DOI
10.1037/a0017497
Version
pre-print, post-print
Citation Information
Brenda Major, Mark Applebaum, Linda Beckman, Mary Ann Dutton, et al.. "Abortion and Mental Health: Evaluating the Evidence" American Psychologist Vol. 64 Iss. 9 (2009) p. 863 - 890
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/carolyn_west/4/