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Article
Testing the Barriers to Digital Libraries: A Study Seeking Copyright Permission to Digitize Published Works
New Library World (2005)
  • Carole A. George, Carnegie Mellon University
Abstract
Purpose: The aim was to explore the issues related to acquiring copyright permission with the goal of determining effectiveness and efficiency using the least complex process. Methodology: A random sample of books was chosen, relevant information was recorded, request letters were sent and tracked, and results (permission received or denied) were analyzed with respect to publisher, publication data, time required, and issues related to the process. Findings: About 52 percent responded with a yes or no with 24 percent Yes responses. Nearly 25 percent never responded, addresses were not found for about 16 percent, approximately 7 percent were too complicated to pursue and response time averaged about 3 months. Implications: The low rate of positive responses indicates the need to focus on publications and publishers most likely to provide permission: older and out-of-print materials, non-commercial publishers, special collections, while using designated staff and personal contact to improve effectiveness. Value: Few previous studies exist in this area. This study might benefit other libraries with respect to planning, defining procedures, and improving results when seeking permissions for copyrighted works.
Keywords
  • copyright permission,
  • digital libray,
  • evaluation,
  • research
Publication Date
2005
Citation Information
Carole A. George. "Testing the Barriers to Digital Libraries: A Study Seeking Copyright Permission to Digitize Published Works" New Library World Vol. 106 Iss. 1214/1215 (2005)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/carole_george/3/