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Article
The Experiences of Minority Immigrant Families Receiving Child Welfare Services: Seeking to Understand How to Reduce Risk and Increase Protective Factors
Social Work Faculty Publications
  • Carol Stalker, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Sarah Maiter, Wilfrid Laurier University
  • Ramona Alaggia, University of Toronto
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2009
Department
Social Work
Abstract
Wide recognition that families in the child welfare system experience multiple stressors has resulted in the development of a range of prevention and intervention strategies at individual, family, and policy levels.1 This article reports on a research study with minority immigrant families. The aim was to understand stressors they perceived as contributing to child welfare interventions, and services they found helpful or unhelpful. Using the conservation of resource (COR) theory, the findings highlight the erosion of resources that increases their vulnerability. Themes that emerged were: loneliness, betrayal, hopelessness, and financial and language struggles. Application of the COR theory combined with contextual insights from participant perspectives can guide policy and practice to focus on resource gain and prevent resource attrition.
Comments

Reprinted with permission from Families in Society (www.FamiliesInSociety.org), published by the Alliance for Children and Families.

Citation Information
Carol Stalker, Sarah Maiter and Ramona Alaggia. "The Experiences of Minority Immigrant Families Receiving Child Welfare Services: Seeking to Understand How to Reduce Risk and Increase Protective Factors" (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/carol_stalker/1/