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Article
The Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention: Impact on Recidivism
Violence and Victims
  • Carla Smith Stover, Yale University Child Study Center
  • Gina Poole, Yale University Child Study Center
  • Steven Marans, Yale University Child Study Center
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2009
Keywords
  • domestic violence; outreach; recidivism; advocacy
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)
https://doi.org/10.1891/0886-6708.24.5.591
Abstract

The domestic violence home-visit intervention (DVHVI) provides home visits by policeadvocate teams within 72-hours of domestic incident to provide safety, psychoeducation, mental health, legal, or additional police assistance. Clinical and police record data were collected for 512 cases, and repeat calls to the police were tracked for 12 months. Analyses revealed that women who engaged with the DVHVI were more likely to contact the police for subsequent events than those who received no or minimal DVHVI contact. Hispanic women served by Spanish-speaking advocate-officer teams were the most likely to utilize services and call the police for subsequent incidents.

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Violence and Victims, v. 24, issue 5, p. 591-606

Citation Information
Carla Smith Stover, Gina Poole and Steven Marans. "The Domestic Violence Home Visit Intervention: Impact on Recidivism" Violence and Victims Vol. 24 Iss. 5 (2009) p. 591 - 607
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/carla_stover/30/